Thursday, June 29, 2017

Seal Garage Floor or Not? – Pros and Cons of Concrete Sealing

There is probably no other floor as hardworking as garage floors are. It carries the weight of the vehicle and all other stored items in the garage. It is exposed to spilled oil, chemicals, and grease. It acquires holes, cracks, and dents upon contact with falling tools. All these are just some of the reasons why professional concrete contractors recommend concrete sealing the garage floor. Here is a brief look at the pros and cons of concrete sealers.

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Pros of Concrete Sealing

  • Sealers help a concrete garage floor repel moisture. Concrete is a very porous material. A layer of sealer seals the pores, keeping it from absorbing any moisture on it.
  • A layer or two of sealer will help extend the lifespan of a garage floor. It serves as a protective layer that keeps damaging elements at bay.
  • Sealing the garage floor helps enhance its aesthetics. Epoxy flooring, for example, dries to a really high gloss, making the floor look polished and shiny.
  • If you have a colored concrete garage flooring, sealers can help keep the color from fading, flaking, or peeling off.
  • Sealers keep any type of liquid from staining the garage floor. Remember how easy it was for grease and oil to leave ugly stain marks on the floor? With a layer of sealer, the grease and oil stay on the surface, making it easy to wipe away completely.

Cons of Concrete Sealing

  • Sealer application is an additional expense for the homeowner. The wider the floor area, the more sealer is needed, the more expensive it will be.
  • Some concrete sealers dry glossy, making the surface less slip-resistant. However, fine aggregate can be added to add some kind of non-skid texture when it dries.
  • Sealers will dull and fade after a few years. Faster if the garage floor experiences heavy vehicle and foot traffic. It would need to be reapplied every couple of years or so.
  • Sealing products can not be used on newly poured concrete. Homeowners would have to wait 28 to 30 days when the concrete has completely cured. Applying the sealer too early will be detrimental to the durability of the new concrete slab.
  • Most sealers are made of chemicals that can be dangerous to both humans and the environment. Environment-friendly versions are being developed nowadays but it costs more than traditional sealing products.

Read More Here: Seal Garage Floor or Not? – Pros and Cons of Concrete Sealing

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